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02-Apr-2015 13:17

Anywhere between 6 to 12 inches could fall this morning in certain parts of the region, not counting the additional snow expected later tonight.In metro areas including New York City, Washington D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia, heavy snow is expected to change into sleet or freezing this afternoon, and then back to snow this evening.“You have a brand, and it’s not just the graphics or the content,” she says. “The audience expects talent to look like they’re at network level, even if they don’t have the same budget or the same help.” Mansfield gives anchors and reporters a “menu for success” to avoid making purchases that won’t go the distance. “If you’re covering a fire or something more rugged, you should wear a vest, with long sleeves underneath, or fire gear. The tricky part is you never know what you’re covering so you have to be prepared for everything.” Steve Chenevey, Fox 5 Co-Host of “Good Day DC,” Washington, D. So after 10 o’clock, and this is huge, I sometimes take my tie off. I have maps behind me, so if I wear too many patterns it can look crazy — and people will let you know about it,” Simmons says. If you wear a subtle pattern and the lines are too close together, they moiré [produce a strange wavy pattern] on camera, even with HD. I would never wear tennis shoes; I would wear shoes. I ended up wearing Ted Baker plaid.” Rosanna Scotto, Fox 5 co-host of “Good Day New York,” New York “I tend to be fashionable, but not fashion-forward — otherwise I’m going to look like the clothes are wearing me, and not like I’m wearing the clothes,” she says. As soon as I got off the air, my boss and everyone around me said, ‘Put that in your closet and keep it there.’ I think when you have too many patterns people are distracted.“It’s also the expectation of the visuals on the talent.” Whether local news or on national, the expectations are the same. So I have a walk-in closet with really brightly colored, jewel-toned dresses.” Marcellas Reynolds, Fashion correspondent, “Good Day L. Anything you wear, think of yourself as Switzerland.” Sandra Lee, Special correspondent, “Good Morning America” “Morning television is a very special kind of TV. They need to trust you and feel good about who you are and what you communicate.

There is reasoning behind every fashion choice on morning TV. Women are the most important consumers there are, and the last thing they need is to feel hyper competitive with someone they view as a friend.” Megan Tevrizian, NBC 7 “News Today” anchor, San Diego “The biggest thing is to dress appropriately for your story, and in the studio we cover hard news as well as lighter segments. is a fairly conservative town fashion-wise, and probably the only city where people may even assume your political stance based on what you wear, so I make sure I wear red and blue at least once every week,” says Chenevey, who anchors five hours daily.

Audrey Mansfield, visual stylist appearance coach for NBC-owned stations, makes sure the look is consistent from coast to coast. “It used to be that you could get a custom suit and it would last you 10 years. One time I wore lip gloss, and my boss said, ‘You can’t have that much lip gloss for a domestic-abuse story,’” Tevrizian says. “As it gets past 9 o’clock, the show becomes a little more entertainment-driven. style.” Stephanie Simmons, CBS 2 morning traffic reporter, Los Angeles “I work on the green screen, so I can’t wear anything green, and some blues also key out. In fact, last time I was there I brought the jacket [in the picture], and they didn’t like it.

While you stare groggily into the abyss of your closet, once again thinking you have nothing to wear, your impeccably groomed morning hosts are there to wish you a good morning on TV. And that you exemplify what their morals are,” says Lee.

But these newscasters didn’t leave their sartorial decisions up to chance. “I like things that are more conservative, but high fashion.

In Georgia, over 200,000 homes and businesses lost electricity due to ice coating trees and power lines, according to the Weather Channel, and two people have reportedly died as a result of the storm—one man from suspected hypothermia, and another woman who passed away in her unheated home.

There is reasoning behind every fashion choice on morning TV. Women are the most important consumers there are, and the last thing they need is to feel hyper competitive with someone they view as a friend.” Megan Tevrizian, NBC 7 “News Today” anchor, San Diego “The biggest thing is to dress appropriately for your story, and in the studio we cover hard news as well as lighter segments. is a fairly conservative town fashion-wise, and probably the only city where people may even assume your political stance based on what you wear, so I make sure I wear red and blue at least once every week,” says Chenevey, who anchors five hours daily.Audrey Mansfield, visual stylist appearance coach for NBC-owned stations, makes sure the look is consistent from coast to coast. “It used to be that you could get a custom suit and it would last you 10 years. One time I wore lip gloss, and my boss said, ‘You can’t have that much lip gloss for a domestic-abuse story,’” Tevrizian says. “As it gets past 9 o’clock, the show becomes a little more entertainment-driven. style.” Stephanie Simmons, CBS 2 morning traffic reporter, Los Angeles “I work on the green screen, so I can’t wear anything green, and some blues also key out. In fact, last time I was there I brought the jacket [in the picture], and they didn’t like it.While you stare groggily into the abyss of your closet, once again thinking you have nothing to wear, your impeccably groomed morning hosts are there to wish you a good morning on TV. And that you exemplify what their morals are,” says Lee.But these newscasters didn’t leave their sartorial decisions up to chance. “I like things that are more conservative, but high fashion.In Georgia, over 200,000 homes and businesses lost electricity due to ice coating trees and power lines, according to the Weather Channel, and two people have reportedly died as a result of the storm—one man from suspected hypothermia, and another woman who passed away in her unheated home.Pax is also creating miserable travel conditions across the Northeast.